Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.
Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.

Art Monograph Ewa Kuryluk "The Fabric of Memory" [1987] Signed ? FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING to the U.S.

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"The Fabric of Memory", Ewa Kuryluk, published in 1987 by Formantions.

First edition, appears to be signed / inscribed by the artist on the page opposite the title page (see accompanying images).


Quarto, wrapped in heavy woven tan cloth, black unadorned endpapers, cloth head and tail band in binding, semi-gloss pages throughout, 160 pages including bibliography.

This is a "very good" vintage hardcover with a solid spine and crisp board hinges. There are no loose, torn or folded pages, no writing aside from what appears to be the artist's inscription as noted previously. The text block is square and closes tightly, somewhat tanned along the top edge. The board corners are square, not bumped. Some light surface wear to the cloth on the back, along with a few small spots toward the spine. Tanned at the spine, a little less so at the top edges.

A very pleasant vintage volume featuring a unique Polish artist.

Will ship promptly, well packaged and fully insured. SHIPS FREE PRIORITY TO THE U.S.

About the artist (from Wikipedia): Ewa Kuryluk (born 5 May 1946) is a Polish artist. She is a pioneer of textile installation, painter, photographer, art historian, novelist and poet, and the author of numerous books, written in Polish and English, many of which have been translated into other languages. She has had over fifty solo exhibitions, participated in many group shows and created outdoor installations throughout the world. Her work can be seen in the National Museums in Warsaw, Cracow, Wroclaw and Poznań, as well as in public and private collections in Europe, USA, Latin America and Japan.

Biography Ewa Kuryluk was born in Cracow, Poland, the first child of Karol Kuryluk, editor of the “Odrodzenie” magazine, and Maria Kuryluk (born Miriam Kohany), writer and amateur pianist. In 1947 the family moved to Warsaw and in 1950 Ewa's brother Piotr was born. In 1959, her father was appointed ambassador to Austria and they moved to Vienna. In 1964, the artist finished Austrian secondary school and commenced her studies at Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts, obtaining her Diploma in painting and M.A. in Art History in 1970. On 9 December 1967 her father died suddenly of a heart attack, and in March 1968 the family was further unsettled by the outbreak of anti-Semitism and the emigration of friends, with her brother showing the first signs of mental illness.

Kuryluk's distinct style of painting and her rebellious nature brought her in conflict with her professors.[1] In 1967 she was granted permission to organize an independent show of student work, including her own, in the staircase of the painting department. The unusual event drew crowds and was reported in the press. However the authorities did not like the stir and she was forbidden to continue.[2] Kuryluk began to export her work clandestinely and to exhibit abroad. Her first solo show at the Woodstock Gallery in London coincided with her final exams in Warsaw, and she kept it secret. In 1976, the Year of the Political Prisoner, she donated work to Amnesty International. In the late 1970s she and her friends, the painters Andrzej Bieńkowski, Andrzej Bielawski and Łukasz Korolkiewicz formed a group with the ironic name “Cream”. Taking advantage of some liberalization under Edward Gierek, she organized an independent international art exhibition, “The Garden of Knowledge” in June 1981, hoping to turn it into a biennial event.[3]

The opening of her first solo show in the United States on 12 December 1981 coincided with the imposition of martial law in Poland. In February 1982, with the aid of a small European Program Exchange grant sponsored by George Soros, she came to the Institute for the Humanities at New York University. Founded by Richard Sennett, the Institute counted Susan Sontag, the Russian poet Joseph Brodsky, and the novelist Edmund White among its members. Appointed a Fellow, she conducted a seminar on shadows, mirrors and doubles in art and literature in 1982 and 1983. She also switched to writing in English and recounted her ludicrous fights with Polish censorship in “Who’s afraid of the little red mouse?” published in The Village Voice. In March 1984 her first New York solo installation opened at Art in General and she kept exhibiting with the non-for-profit gallery until 1989.[4] She taught at New School for Social Research, New York University and University of California, San Diego. 1985 she was honored for her activity on behalf of free speech and human rights by the New York Fund for Free Expression. In July 1989, after a compromise had been reached between the Polish regime and Solidarity, she visited with her family in Warsaw, renewed contact with her fellow artists and soon resumed her professional activities.[5] 1992 she founded the association Amici di Tworki to support patients at the huge mental hospital near Warsaw. In 2012 she was awarded the Gloria Artis for merit to Polish culture.